Green Markets

EWN Publishing

Archive for the ‘South Australia’ Category

Australia joins US-initiated Global Nuclear Energy Partnership at a meeting in Vienna on 16 Sep: plans to build build nuclear reactors

Posted by gmarkets on 4 October, 2007

Mark Bishop, Senator for Western Australia, Shadow Minister for Defence, Australian Labor Party, Commonwealth Senate, 18 September 2007 asked if “Australia to joining a group that will see nuclear fuel leased to countries, then returned to fuel suppliers for reprocessing and then potentially stored in other members’ countries?.. after the Liberal Party Federal Council, in June this year, overwhelmingly voted in support of establishing a nuclear waste dump in Australia to take spent fuel from other countries?”. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Posted in Australia, Emissions, Energy, Green Markets 1001, Nuclear, Policy, Politics, South Australia | Leave a Comment »

Murray Darling Dust Bowl Report: failure of winter and spring rainfall: no water for Sunraysia, near Euston (NSW) and Robinvale (Victoria)

Posted by gmarkets on 4 October, 2007

Water flowing to Adelaide was so sparse and salted that is was technically unusable. “Very high salinities of around 13 000 EC continue to be recorded in the Goolwa channel upstream of the Goolwa Barrage”. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Australia, Emissions, Energy, Green Markets 1001, NSW, South Australia, Victoria, Water | Leave a Comment »

SA based Penrice Soda’s new $500,000 desalination plant: zero waste on salty bore water with $600,000 a year running cost

Posted by gmarkets on 3 October, 2007

According to Penrice Soda chief executive Guy Roberts, a new $500,000 desalination plant using salty bore water supplied the soda-ash maker with one gigalitre of water since December – 67 per cent of its annual need or enough water for 10,000 Adelaide households for a year, reported The Advertiser, (21/08/2007, p.33).

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Desalination, Green Markets 1001, South Australia | Leave a Comment »

Government and Business SA will work together to help individual firms or industries draw up an emissions agreements

Posted by gmarkets on 19 September, 2007

Business leaders and the South Australian State Government have signed a groundbreaking climate change agreement aimed at limiting greenhouse gas emissions, reported The Advertiser (6/9/07, p. 9).

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Accounting, Credits, Emissions, Emissions Trading, Green Markets 0919, Lobby Groups, Regulation, South Australia | Leave a Comment »

CO2 dump rules in South Australia, Western Australia and Queensland: none appear to deal with earthquake, water quality or leak risks, or, long-term liability

Posted by gmarkets on 19 September, 2007

South Australia had amended the Petroleum Act 2000 to include CO2 as a regulated substance which can be transported by pipeline. This Act also provides for the granting of a licence to store CO2 in natural reservoirs.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in CCS, CO2 Dumps, Geosequestration, Green Markets 0919, Law, Policy, Queensland, South Australia, Western Australia | Leave a Comment »

South Australia nearly doubles green power subscribers, more than trebles megawatt hours in past year

Posted by gmarkets on 18 September, 2007

South Australia had recorded the biggest growth in the nation in green power consumption in the past year, reported The Advertiser (14/9/2007, p.3).

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Green Markets 0919, South Australia | Leave a Comment »

Customer response uncertain, but innovative South Australian scheme to feed photovoltaic power into grid starts 1 July 2008

Posted by gmarkets on 17 September, 2007

The South Australian government was taking a measured approach to a scheme to allow photovoltaic generators to feed electricity into the network, Minister for Energy P.F. Conlon said in the South Australian House of Assembly on 12 September 2007.

A first for Australia: Conlon said: “There has been some criticism that this scheme should have gone further by providing a higher rebate for a longer period, and applied to gross production. As this is a new policy of this kind for Australia, we cannot be certain how customers will respond until it has had a chance to operate. Therefore, the Government has determined that it will review the scheme’s operation after the first two and a half years or when the installed capacity of residential small-scale grid connected solar PV systems reaches 10 Mega Watts, whichever comes first.”

Five-year scheme: “In order to deal with ever changing technologies and Federal Government policies, it has been decided that the scheme will be of 5 years duration and be reviewed in order to assess how effective the scheme has been and to accommodate this changing environment,” Conlon said. “Realising that electricity retailers and the distributor will require some time to establish the processes, it is expected that the scheme would commence no later than 1 July 2008. We are hopeful, however, that retailers and the distributor would be able to put required changes in place earlier than 1 July 2008. Regardless of the commencement date, the scheme will conclude on 30 June 2013, which will allow householders to take advantage of the full five years of rebates under the scheme. In conclusion, the scheme will enhance the State’s international reputation for leading the response to climate change, by playing to our strength in renewable energy generally and, in this case, in deployment of solar energy for homes.”

Reference: P.F. Conlon, Minister for Energy, House of Assembly, South Australia, 12 September 2007.

Erisk Net, 16/9/2007

Posted in South Australia | Leave a Comment »

Retailers not forced to offer contracts to customers in South Australian PV scheme

Posted by gmarkets on 17 September, 2007

Further details of South Australia’s scheme to allow photovoltaic generators to feed power to the electricity network were given by Minister for Energy P.F. Conlon in South Australia’s House of Assembly on 12 September 2007.

Retailers not forced to offer contracts: Conlon said: “In accordance with the national competition principles, we are not forcing retailers to offer contracts to PV owners as part of this scheme. However, we recognise that if an existing customer of a retailer installs and wishes to connect a solar PV system, the retailer will be obliged to pass on the feed-in incentive for as long as the retail contract between the retailer and the customer remains in place. Electricity retailers will have an opportunity to assess the advantages and disadvantages of participating in the scheme relative to their business objectives. Accordingly, only retailers that perceive there to be value in the scheme would be expected to accept or keep customers with photovoltaic systems. In assessing whether there is value in the scheme, retailers would be expected to take implementation costs into account. The implementation ‘cost per customer’ may be higher for smaller retailers.”

Reference: P.F. Conlon, Minister for Energy, House of Assembly, South Australia, 12 September 2007.

Erisk Net, 16/9/2007

Posted in South Australia | Leave a Comment »

South Australian desalination plant at Cape Jervis could be linked to other development opportunities in south, argues MP

Posted by gmarkets on 17 September, 2007

Michael Pengilly said in the South Australian House of Assembly on 12 September 2007 that he supported siting any desalination plant to supply water to Adelaide at Cape Jervis.

Deep water and infrastructure support: “My reason for putting forward that option is that … [experts] have talked about the brine going into the gulf and having to put in a long pipeline, etc.,” said Pengilly. “My view is that, if you put the desalination plant at Cape Jervis in what is very deep water — 300 feet just off Cape Jervis — you do not have a problem with the brine because of the exceptional flow up and down Backstairs Passage. It also has the environmental advantage of Starfish Hill wind farm, which could be used and which could be expanded to augment the power for the desalination plant. You could also put in a supply line through the western Fleurieu.”

Viable alternative: Pengilly said water could be pumped to Myponga and put through a filtration plant, whether at Cape Jervis or Myponga. He pointed out that the water from Myponga came back to Sellicks Beach and to Happy Valley reservoir. “We will have to put in a vast amount of infrastructure, whatever we do, Pengilly said. “Bear in mind that the current desalination plant at Penneshaw (which is just across the other side) already drops its brine into deep water and it is only a small plant. I believe that it actually could be a viable alternative to the suggested ideas that have been put forward both by the opposition and the government, without any firm target at this stage of where to put such a desalination plant. If we are half smart about this, we will think it through and get the best possible outcome for South Australians.”

Cost blowout: “I am concerned that today the Minister for Infrastructure did not refute the blow-out to $1.6 billion. Where will the costings come from? This thing will cost a lot of money. It will take a lot of power. The option of using some electricity from Starfish Hill and the option of looking at wave power generated through Backstairs Passage as well — I understand that in Europe they have generators moored offshore and use the tidal flows through the English Channel up to northern Europe quite regularly.”

Southern development opportunity: Calling on the state government to consider opposition ideas, Pengilly said that as well as extremely deep water in the Cape Jervis area, the added benefit of providing water to the south, coming through from Cape Jervis, needed to be thought about. “The south is developing rapidly, he said. “Myponga Dam currently services Goolwa, Yankalilla, Normanville and Victor Harbor; and some water does go back into the Sellicks Beach area. The dam is being underutilised. The government had announced already that there is a major upgrade to filtration down there. Quite clearly, if a desalination plant is built, we would have to have a bigger filtration plant. No-one argues about that in any way, shape or form. However, I am concerned that there is not much vision in this government. It does not want to think too far past whatever ideas are thrown up within its own ranks. I am throwing up this idea in the best interests of South Australia. It is a good possibility,” concluded Pengilly.

Reference: Michael Pengilly, Member for Finniss, House of Assembly, South Australia, 12 September 2007.

Erisk Net, 16/9/2007

Posted in South Australia | Leave a Comment »

South Australia’s Electricity Supply Industry Act amended: allows electricity generated by small photovoltaic generator to be fed into network

Posted by gmarkets on 17 September, 2007

South Australia’s Minister for Energuy P.F. Conlon outlined provisions of amendments to Part 3 of the Electricity Supply Industry Act in South Australia’s House of Assembly on 12 September 2007. Definitions: The Minister said: “The following definitions are relevant to the operation of this Division:

• domestic customer means a customer—(a) who acquires electricity primarily for domestic use; and (b) who satisfies other criteria (if any) prescribed by the regulations for the purposes of this definition;

• excluded network means a distribution network that supplies electricity to less than 10 000 domestic customers;

• qualifying generator means a small photovoltaic generator — (a) that is operated by a domestic customer; and (b) that complies with Australian Standard AS 4777 (as in force from time to time or as substituted from time to time); and (c) that is connected to a distribution network in a manner that allows electricity generated by the small photovoltaic generator to be fed into the network, other than where the distribution network is an excluded network; and

• small photovoltaic generator means a photovoltaic system with capacity up to 10kVA for a single phase connection and up to 30kVA for a three phase connection.”

Domestic users able to feed electricity to network: “The Division will make it a condition of an existing or future licence authorising the operation of a distribution network, other than an excluded network, that the holder of the licence will allow a domestic customer to feed electricity into the network through the use of a qualifying generator,” the Minister said. “A domestic customer who qualifies under this scheme will be credited with $0.44 per kWh. It will then be a condition of the licence of the electricity entity that sells electricity as a retailer to the domestic customer (including a licence on the commencement of this measure) that the credit will be reflected in the charges payable by the domestic customer for the supply of electricity.”

Reference: P.F. Conlon, Minister for Energy, House of Assembly, South Australia, 12 September 2007.

Erisk Net, 16/9/2007

Posted in South Australia | Leave a Comment »