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Archive for the ‘Agriculture’ Category

Richest 1pc of US farmers get 72pc of govt subsidies; cotton costs $US156,000 per farmer; global fishing subsidies hurt poor nations, ruin ecology

Posted by gmarkets on 5 October, 2007

In the US, the richest 1 per cent of farmers got 72 per cent of the government payouts, and US cotton subsidies cost nearly $US4 billion, or $US156,000 a farmer, wrote Mike Moore in The Australian Financial Review (4/10/2007, p.63). Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Agriculture, Australia, Emissions, Energy, Global, Green Markets 1002, Policy, Politics, US, Water | Leave a Comment »

Tropical feed-grasses outperform other forage crops: more forage, less soil erosion

Posted by gmarkets on 4 October, 2007

Tropical grasses were almost certain to play an increased role in grazing systems, reported The Land (26/7/2007, p.15). Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Agriculture, Australia, Emissions, Energy, Green Markets 1001, Land, Vegetation, Water | Leave a Comment »

Research will forecast weather conditions in 100 kilometre by 100km quadrants

Posted by gmarkets on 20 September, 2007

The research will forecast weather conditions in 100 kilometre by 100km quadrants across the country, with the collected data then used to identify probable changes to factors such as growing seasons, yields and the effect on livestock reported The Land (23/8/2007, p. 3). Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Agriculture, Climate, Emissions, Green Markets 0919, Policy, Vegetation | Leave a Comment »

Federal Court case: Monaro district grazier seeks billions of dollars in compensation from Fed Govt for carbon credit payments denied to farmers

Posted by gmarkets on 20 September, 2007

The bid in the Federal Court by Monaro district grazier, Peter Spencer, to seek billions of dollars in compensation from the Federal Government for carbon credit payments denied to farmers, was to come up for a further hearing in Canberra on 31 August, reported The Land (30/8/2007, p.14). Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Agriculture, Biofuels, Credits, Federal, Green Markets 0919, Policy, Vegetation | Leave a Comment »

Federal judge Robert French rejects ATO’s case that investor’s $30,000 to grow Indian sandalwood between 1998 and 2000 had main purpose of avoiding tax

Posted by gmarkets on 20 September, 2007

According to Patrick Durkin in The Australian Financial Review (17/9/2007, p.8), the Australian Taxation Office’s push to outlaw tax deductions for agricultural investment schemes had suffered a setback after a court ruled they could constitute a “serious commercial venture”. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Agriculture, Deforestation, Forest, Green Markets 0919, Law, Lobby Groups | Leave a Comment »

Biofuel feedstock: only real waste-biomass we have is urban waste, otherwise dumped in landfill, says enviro consultant

Posted by gmarkets on 20 September, 2007

Straw and grass have been suggested as good feedstock for biofuel plants, but were they really waste?, asked Dr Peter Wylie, a researcher and consultant specialising in environmental issues, in The Courier Mail (1/9/2007, p.58). Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Agriculture, Biofuels, Energy, Gas, Green Markets 0919 | Leave a Comment »

Policy must control food and price increases: von Braun warns subsidies for agriculture and biofuel will push up price of grains and feedstock

Posted by gmarkets on 19 September, 2007

Growth in biofuels could significantly push up food and grain prices, Dr von Braun, director-general of the International Food Policy Research Institute told the The Canberra Times(15/08/07, p. 15). Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Agriculture, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Policy, Public Opinion | Leave a Comment »

Posted by gmarkets on 19 September, 2007

Return of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon: Roof gardens a new green statement Roof gardens had become the latest architectural statement, reported The Australian (15/9/2007, p. 1). Market gardens in the sky: Even celebrity gardener Jamie Durie was getting in on the act, the newspaper reported. Durie’s company, Patio, was currently working, or had worked, on roof garden projects in Sydney, New York and Chicago, where they had already cottoned on to the idea with greater gusto. In Chicago the Department of Environ­ment had been giving away $5000 grants to building owners who wanted to start a green roof project. One New York entrepreneur, Ali Zabar, supplied his restaurants and grocery store with vegetables he grew in greenhouse gardens on the roofs of his New York establishments. He employed two farmers full-time to tend 2000sqm of sky gardens.

Self-sufficiency aim of eco city: “Leading the way on a larger scale, however, will be Dongtan, at the mouth of the Yangtse River on China’s third largest island, Chongming,” said The Australian. “It will be the world’s first purpose-built eco­city and stage one will be built in the next four years — when Shanghai will host the 2010 World Expo. Buildings will be no more than eight storeys high, with gardens on their roofs. It will be pedestrian friendly and generate all its own energy needs. Meanwhile, most of the city’s waste will be recycled and organic waste will be composted or burnt in incinerators to generate electricity.”

The Australian, 15/9/2007, p. 1

Posted in Agriculture, Cities, Green Markets 0919, How to make money | Leave a Comment »

Local breeds more suited to extreme conditions: reliance on a few high-yield breeds risks mass extinctions, warns FAO

Posted by gmarkets on 19 September, 2007

The world’s livestock produc­tion had become dangerously over-reliant on just a few high-yielding breeds, causing the loss of many hardier breeds more suited to poor countries, accord­ing to a report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) reported The Australian (5/9/2007, p. 32). One breed goes extinct every month: In its first survey of the world’s animal genetic resources, the FAO said 20 per cent of the more than 7600 breeds of farm animals and poultry it had iden­tified were at risk of extinction. Almost one breed had been lost every month over the past six years.

Value revealed too late: Carlos Sere, director general of the International Livestock Re­search Institute, a publicly fun­ded Nairobi-based research net­work, called for the rapid esta­blishment of gene banks, espe­cially in Africa, to conserve the sperm and eggs of animals at risk. “Valuable breeds are disap­pearing at an alarming rate,” he told an international technical conference on animal genetic resources in Interlaken, Switzer­land. “In many cases we will not even know the true value of an existing breed until it is already gone. This is why we need to act now to conserve what’s left by putting them in gene banks.”

Locals cope better: In northern Vietnam, for in­stance, local breeds comprised nearly three-quarters of the sow population in 1994, but by 2000 this proportion had dropped to only a quarter. During a recent drought in Uganda, for example, farmers who kept their hardy Ankole cattle were able to walk them long distances to water sources, while those who had traded them for Holstein-Friesians lost their entire herds.

The Australian, 5/9/2007, p. 32

Posted in Agriculture, Extinctions, Policy | Leave a Comment »

WA pastoralists asked to vote on the Government’s proposed model for environmental management of the rangelands

Posted by gmarkets on 19 September, 2007

Western Australia’s pastoralists would have the opportunity to have a direct say on the State Government’s proposed model for pastoral leases for environmental management of the rangelands by getting to vote on the model, reported Farm Weekly, (06/09/2007, p.12) quoting State Planning and Infrastructure Minister Alannah McTiernan.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Agriculture, Deforestation, Ecosystem Trading, Green Markets 0919, Land, Law, Regulation, Western Australia | Leave a Comment »