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Tasmanian pulp mill air quality permits changed at Gunn’s request; doctors warn against unacceptable risk from pollution

Posted by gmarkets on 3 September, 2007

According to Sue Neales, pulp-mill proponent Gunns had insisted that it must have its Tasmanian pulp mill approved by September or risk losing as much as $1 million a day in increased construction and equipment contract costs and production losses, reported The Mercury (30/8/2007, p. 7). Tasmanian Govt changes permits on request: Meanwhile Environment Minister Paula Wriedt yesterday admitted in parliament that permits governing air quality emissions from the pulp mill had been changed at Gunn’s request. She said limits governing the emission of polluting nitrogen oxides had been relaxed because it was clear Gunns would not be able to meet recommended Resource Planning and Development Commission Guidelines.

Doctors cite polluting particles, nauseous smell, truck accidents, food chain woes: Tasmanian doctors have warned the State’s politicians not to risk building a pulp mill in the Tamar Valley because of the unacceptable risk to human health. Four particular health concerns – and the unanswered questions relating to them – have together led the Australian Medical Association to take such a strong stand against the pulp mill. They related to the additional air pollution particles in the Tamar Valley so close to Launceston city, the likelihood of the mill’s bad smell causing headaches and nausea, the expected increase in log truck accidents and the accumulation of toxic dioxins and furans in the food chain.

State Govt “derelict”: Outside Parliament house yesterday, Tamar Valley olive grower Peter Henning accused the State Government of a “thorough dereliction” of its duties by pushing for a pulp mill it knew would pollute the ocean, use nearly as much water as all of northern Tasmania combined and put harmful dioxins into the food chain.

The Mercury, 30/8/2007, p. 7

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